Brad & Bryan Caviness - BC Clay Art

 

                                                                                     Hagia Sophia, Constantinople

                                                                                    Hagia Sophia, Constantinople

                                                                          Hagia Sophia, Constantinople - close-up

                                                                         Hagia Sophia, Constantinople - close-up

                                                                                                Acropolis, Greece

                                                                                               Acropolis, Greece

                                                                                                    Antioch, Syria

                                                                                                   Antioch, Syria

 

About BC Clay Art

(Brad and Brian Caviness)

The sculptures of B.C. Clay Art are inspired by the archaeology of great civilizations; the artifacts of pottery and architecture that are reassembled from mere shards and rubble found among the crumbled foundations of wondrous structures and cultural sites from around the globe.

Following a misfiring of their kiln that resulted in much broken pottery, brothers Brad and Bryan Caviness noted that the fragments were visually reminiscent of the artifacts of archaeological digs.  They admired the shapes and shadows created by the cracks, spalling, and missing pieces that exposed the interior of the jars.  It is within these revealed spaces that they envisioned landscapes and environments that the vessels inspired.

Applying their creative skillsets that include degrees in art and architecture respectively, Brad and Bryan conjure evocative sculptures of important sites and structures that are housed within distressed reproductions of iconic, relevant vessels and jars.  The sculptures confront the viewer with a fractured and broken pottery form from which light emanates, beckoning them to approach the vessel in an intimate relationship, and transporting them into a panoramic view of the illuminated world inside. Their process generally begins by studying architectural reconstructions and choosing sites which have a personal or aesthetic appeal.  Once a viewpoint to depict the scene is discovered that is both interesting and informative, vessels are researched that are in keeping with the design, and that have a suitable interior volume in which to 'work in' the perspective.

After experimenting with breaks and crushes administered by all manner of blows, dropping, and explosions, the Caviness brothers devise strategically-missing shards and openings that are designed to complement the viewpoint of the interior scene.  The sculpted foreground draws the eye in through successive forced-perspective layers to wander into the distant horizon.  The background is finished with base relief and painting of landscape and sky.  All of these considerations are subject to the artistic imperatives of proportion, scale, and placement through jarring juxtapositions of archetypes to affect the desired result.

A shaft of light brings the scene to life, transforming the interior into an expansive space, so that when properly lit, the viewer experiences a full panorama as they peer through the portal break.  The pot or jar that was the vessel of goods is now the vessel of conveyance, transporting the viewer through time and space to evoke the spirit of these archaeological wonders.

Through their portrayal of icons of architectural civilizations, B.C. Clay Art hopes to bring awareness to the fragility of mankind's works, spark a sense of wonder and goodwill for our World Heritage Sites, while fostering interest in studying and preserving them for the future.